Uruguay, by João (11)

Hey, it’s João and today we will be doing a post on Uruguay!!!! This is the beginning of the world trip to places we’ve never been before, so I hope you enjoy it.
1: Arriving At Montevideo.
When we arrived at Montevideo, there was still stuff in English, because we were at the airport, so that makes sense.
We stayed about an hour walking around with bags on, and listening to Coral complain about everything. So it wasn’t the best day ever. We ate Burger King, at Tres Cruces, and went home walking.
The house was pretty big, had two bathrooms (which is usually needed for us), and I loved how the owner made a bunch of outlets for international tourists. There were one for Europe, one for Japan/USA, one for Oceania/China, and the obvious Uruguay ones, which are the same as Brazil, except for the fact that the earth part of the plug is on the same line as the other two dots. In Brazil, it’s slightly lower.
tres cruces montevideo uruguay

Dad, you photo interrupter!!

2: Weird splitting of colors in the water.
This was also at Montevideo, we were having a loooooooooooooooooooooooong walk, by the shores, and there was this really weird line in the water dividing the blue water from the brown water. Why it was like this, we didn’t know until way after when we went back home, which took a while, mom went to do research and found out it was actually the division where the seawater and river water meet, and the quantity of salt in the water is way too different so it takes time for them to join. Weird right?
rio de la plata montevideo uruguay

Isn’t the color division weird?

3: Estadio Centenario.
This is a national landmark, the only football stadium to ever be, and is huuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuge. Man, that place is huge.
Estadio centenario montevideo uruguay

Huuuuuge stadium!!!

My dad always wanted to go there, since he loves football and everything, so he went to the top of the stadium. I also did, and so did mom and Coral, but José and Melissa stayed at the bottom. When we were getting back down, mom did this thing we call butt-sliding, which is a way of getting down creepy places. I never needed to do it, and hopefully, never will. Melissa does it a lot too, José really rarely, and dad just walks. Coral just does it because it’s funny.
After we went down, we went to the part under the stadium, which was all broken from under, totally not safe.
estadio centenario montevideo uruguay

It’s all broken on the roof. How unsafe.

4: Colonia del Sacramento.
This was a 3 hour-ish trip by bus to Colonia, and at Tres Cruces, when we were waiting, dad was getting an Internet Chip for mom, so I went with him to get the chip. Mom said the Chip was for maps (which we needed) but it was mostly for Pokemon GO. Haha.
Well anyways, when I went with dad to get the Chip, a moth landed on me. I showed it to everyone, then I went to make it go outside. It didn’t want to go, but I managed to get it off. Sorry if the photo is too blurry.
blue moth montevideo uruguay

Mothy!!!!

There were plenty of ruins of battle forts, broken walls, plenty of cannons.
Centro bastion del carmen colonia uruguay

Look at the wall ruin!

When we were there, we tried to see the sunset every day, even though I and José didn’t enjoy doing so, we had to. Or stay alone in the house. Hehe.
I got some good photos like the one from the first photo.
And I managed to get one right before the sun set.
sunset colonia del sacramento uruguay

What a beautiful sunset.

Yeah, this wasn’t too fun, but what was fun was the day we hired a buggy. It was for 6 people, 2 at the front, 2 in the middle, and 2 looking backward. I and José were at the back for a majority of the time, and once mom even lost her phone. Man, that was weird.
If you enjoyed this post be sure to comment any questions, comments, and I’ll see you next time!! Bye!!
1 reply
  1. Tatiana Saito
    Tatiana Saito says:

    Que legal, Juca! Seu post parece ser muito mais animado que o da Mel, apesar de não ser totalmente feliz! Ahahahahahaha! Parece que Montevideo e Colonia são cidades de velhos, onde os jovens não tem muito o que fazer.

    Reply

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